Sleep Disorders and…sweating?!

Index Support Center Forums Living with N Sleep Disorders and…sweating?!

This topic contains 18 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by Myturnleft 2 months ago. This post has been viewed 839 times

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #7446
    Avatar
    KatieLady
    Keymaster
    @katielady

    Hey all! Long time, no post – I know. I can’t even describe how busy I’ve been the past year!

    I am moving in two weeks, but my current roommate has idiopathic hypersomnia (which, btw, it is AMAZING to live with someone who fully and completely understands what a sleep disorder feels like! such a blessing). Anyway, we both have noticed that we sweat SO. MUCH.

    It’s not like I’m sweating sitting at my desk, but when it’s hot out I will get far far far sweatier than a regular person. Or when I exercise, I look like I jumped into a pool. The worst is for weddings – I legitimately look like someone poured a bucket of water on me just from tearing up the dance floor.

    Is there ANY link from between our disorders and sweating? And is there anyway to help treat it? It’s not like it’s my armpits or somewhere I can just apply a very strong antiperspirant to. Honestly, the worst is my head! My scalp and my face drip sweat – and so does my roommmates!

    Any thoughts?

    #7448
    Jason
    Jason
    Keymaster
    @jasonm

    @katielady Hey stranger! Hope you’re doing well! Be glad you at least have some options for work clothing apparel, haha. Problems with heat regulation seem to be pretty common in N and IH, unfortunately. I’ve definitely had problems with excessive sweating even unmedicated, mostly under my arms thankfully, which was easy to treat with an Rx. But stimulants and antidepressants both frequently have excessive sweating as a side effect. So it could just be a side effect of medications. Caffeine seems to be the worst for me. It’s a pretty crap stimulant so you might try going without it for a few days – although it might make you sleepier for a few days without because of caffeine dependence.

    But as far as medications are concerned to treat excessive sweating that can’t be treated with topical stuff, the options are limited to medications known as anticholinergics that don’t cross into the brain like glycopyrrolate. The ones that do enter the brain are horrible stuff but the ones that don’t still have some side effects like dry mouth. They can also cause you to get too hot because of the reduced sweating. It might be worth a try if it’s bothering you significantly.

    If it’s mostly bugging you at home, you could get a dehumidifier but that won’t do much for the dance floor!

    Fun facts: Unless your roomie has the super long sleep type of IH, most research is pointing toward IH and N2 being the same condition. Chances of randomly selecting two people as roommates and both having N/IH? 1/400,000!

    #7451
    Avatar
    KatieLady
    Keymaster
    @katielady

    @jasonm it’s so funny that you say that because I had NO IDEA that Secondary Narcolepsy was even a thing until I was catching up on this page today! And I texted her because it seems pretty likely that’s what she has – her sleep disorder only came about after surgery to remove a brain tumor. Or by N2 do you mean type two?

    Thanks for giving me your thoughts on the sweating issue! I’m going to look into that kind of medication, if only for periods where I will be in public and sweating, like weddings.

    #7454
    Ferret
    Ferret
    Moderator
    @ferret

    My head is always dripping too! I don’t sweat much elsewhere but, after exercising or trimming a hedge etc., it’s like a tap got turned on. I’ve been saying for a lotta years that my thermometer is busted. And, don’t blame it on meds because I don’t take ’em and I only have three cups of coffee in the morning and that’s it.

    #7456
    Jason
    Jason
    Keymaster
    @jasonm

    @katielady No problem! Ah I meant type 2.

    Secondary in medical jargon generally means it was caused by an identifiable underlying problem and the secondary condition happened as a consequence. Brain tumors, some rare genetic diseases, etc can all cause secondary narcolepsy but not everyone with the primary condition gets the secondary. Ie a brain tumor is causing narcolepsy and sometimes removing it “cures” the narcolepsy.

    People with brain injuries oftentimes have low orexin and can get full blown N and brain surgery is pretty much impossible to do without causing some damage. Was her tumor in/near the hypothalamus? Does she sleep a really long time? There’s some research that suggests a harmless and cheap amino acid supplement might be helpful for her since it was caused by the surgery.

    #7459
    Jason
    Jason
    Keymaster
    @jasonm

    @ferret You could adopt my haircut lol 🙂

    #7462
    Ferret
    Ferret
    Moderator
    @ferret

    @jasonm I’ll pass thank you 😉 At least my hair soaks up some of it.
    The other thing that is happening now, is that when my head sweats like that, if I don’t wash my face immediately after it stops, I get a rash wherever the sweat has run down my face… especially the sides of my face and into my eyes and eyebrows.
    UGGGGH.

    #7469
    Avatar
    KatieLady
    Keymaster
    @katielady

    @jasonm – she doesn’t sleep excessively like some people with IH, but her tumor and her surgery were near the hypothalamus! What is the supplement you’re talking about??? I’d love to share that with her!

    #7472
    Jason
    Jason
    Keymaster
    @jasonm

    @katielady Ahh, I had a feeling it was the hypothalamus, the location of those pesky orexin neurons. The supplement is branched chain amino acids. It’s usually abbreviated as BCAAs. I’ll do some more digging to see how much she should take if she’s interested in trying it.

    #7483
    Avatar
    Natdoc
    Participant
    @natdoc

    KatieLady
    Jason
    Most folks who ingest protein from meats, eggs or legumes get their share of amino acids ( leucine, isoleucine and valine). If they are unable then I have found that the supplements from life extension are more than adequate. Although mostly used for muscle protein synthesis they are also effective for excessive fatigue.
    I have found that one of the most essential supplements for anyone is Astragulus (In chinese medicine known as Huang Qui) It is in the legume family and its proven scientific benefits include BP regulation, heart health, Blood sugar control, anti cancer, stress relief and AUTOIMMUNE REGULATION.
    Hey guys the healthiest people on the planet have been using this plant for nearly 5000 years, I’m pretty sure they are on the right track.
    Best of Luck

    #7494
    Avatar
    KatieLady
    Keymaster
    @katielady

    @jasonm @natdoc

    Thank you!! I’ll pass it along to my roommate!

    #7499
    Jason
    Jason
    Keymaster
    @jasonm

    @natdoc

    I agree there’s no need to take BCAAs with sufficient protein intake in most people. However, relatively new research suggests people with brain injuries have abnormally low BCAAs in their brains post injury with a normal diet. They’ve done 3 animal studies with BCAAs all with positive results and five human studies, four of which showed benefit. BCAAs may be better for this particular situation than just increasing protein consumption since amino acids compete for the transporters into the brain. It’s pretty cool research since the treatment is natural and obviously extremely safe. I can post some link to the studies if you’re interested!

    I’ll check out that herb you recommended!

    #7509
    Ferret
    Ferret
    Moderator
    @ferret

    Links please Jason. I would LOVE to read the research. T.I.A.

    #7514
    Jason
    Jason
    Keymaster
    @jasonm

    @ferret Here you go! Unfortunately no research has been done in mild cases of brain injuries in humans. Interestingly people with head trauma often have EDS and often have low orexin. There’s nothing to suggest it would work for normal narcolepsy unfortunately.

    Edit:

    Here’s one in mice showing the orexin link.

    #7517
    Avatar
    Natdoc
    Participant
    @natdoc

    Jason
    Thanks my friend. Have been doing quite a bit of research lately on secondary Narcolepsy and TBI seems to be a major factor. Interesting stuff, I am aware of 5 folks personally who have suffered brain injury and then developed narcolepsy, all without any prior history whatsoever.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4760657/
    Think I will follow this down the rabbit hole for awhile
    All my best

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.